Mesopotamia Region: DPARMES

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Mesopotamia Region
La Mesopotamia or Región Mesopotámica is the humid and verdant area of north-east Argentina, comprising the provinces of Misiones, Entre Ríos and Corrientes. The landscape and its characteristics are dominated by two rivers, the Paraná and the Uruguay.The long parallel courses of the two rivers, and the verdant areas between them, inspired comparisons to the region called Mesopotamia land between rivers, in modern-day Iraq. The Spanish named the Argentine region after the Mideast region. The Provinces of Formosa, Chaco and Santa Fe share Mesopotamia's features, as do the neighboring regions of nearby Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Puerto Iguazú is a border city in the province of Misiones, Argentina. With a population of 82,227, it is the fourth largest city in the Province, after Posadas, Oberá, and Eldorado.The world-renowned Iguazú Falls are only 18 kilometres (11 mi) away from the city, and as a result the city has developed much of its infrastructure around tourism.

Surroundings
Iguazu Falls The Iguazu Falls are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of the Argentine province of Misiones and the Brazilian state of Paraná. They are the largest waterfalls system in the world.The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River rises near the city of Curitiba. For most of its course, the river flows through Brazil; however, most of the falls are on the Argentine side. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil.

The falls may be reached from two main towns, with one on either side of the falls: Puerto Iguazú in Argentina and Foz do Iguaçu in Brazil, as well as from Ciudad del Este, Paraguay, on the other side of the Paraná river from Foz do Iguaçu. The falls are shared by the Iguazú National Park (Argentina) and Iguaçu National Park (Brazil). The two parks were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1984 and 1987, respectively.

Iguazú department Map
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